The Puzzle of Sexual Orientation

The leading journal Archives of Sexual Behavior has a special section in its new issue, The Puzzle of Sexual Orientation. I am delighted to be a co-author on an article with Prof. Ritch Savin-Williams and others that provides evidence for “mostly gay” as a sexual orientation category. I have further research with Prof. Savin-Williams on this issue currently under review. The current article, Gay, Mostly Gay, or Bisexual Leaning Gay?, is available here.

Gay, Mostly Gay, or Bisexual Leaning Gay? An Exploratory Study Distinguishing Gay Sexual Orientations Among Young Men

Ritch C. Savin-Williams, Brian M. Cash, Mark McCormack, and Gerulf Rieger

This exploratory study assessed physiological, behavioral, and self-report measures of sexual and romantic indicators of sexual orientation identities among young men (mean age = 21.9 years) with predominant same-sex sexual and romantic interests: those who described themselves as bisexual leaning gay (n = 11), mostly gay (n = 17), and gay (n = 47). Although they were not significantly distinguishable based on physiological (pupil dilation) responses to nude stimuli, on behavioral and self-report measures a descending linear trend toward the less preferred sex (female) was significant regarding sexual attraction, fantasy, genital contact, infatuation, romantic relationship, sex appeal, and gazing time to the porn stimuli. Results supported a continuum of sexuality with distinct subgroups only for the self-report measure of sexual attraction. The other behavioral and self-report measures followed the same trend but did not significantly differ between the bisexual leaning gay and mostly gay groups, likely the result of small sample size. Results suggest that romantic indicators are as good as sexual measures in assessing sexual orientation and that a succession of logically following groups from bisexual leaning gay, mostly gay, to gay. Whether these three groups are discrete or overlapping needs further research.

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Homophobia in Sport Inquiry, DCMS

Today, I am giving evidence to the Department of Culture, Media and Sport for their inquiry into Homophobia in Sport. I will be giving evidence on broader issues of homophobia in contemporary society and among young people, including education and sport. You can read the notes I submitted to the inquiry in advance of my oral evidence, here.

#CodomEmoji

I have undertaken independent research funded by Durex on technology and seCondom Emojix, and safe sex education. This more recent study has been used as part of the campaign for a condom emoji, which I support. See more about the campaign from Durex, here.

New Research Report on Condom Use and Sexual Health

My research funded by Durex examines how young people discuss safe sex, their use of condoms and the potential for a condom emoji. The full report can be accessed here.

Condom Emoji

Talk at Center for Men and Masculinities, SUNY Stonybrook – Manhattan

My talk is titled ‘Those cuddling Brits: Spooning, intimacy and the transformation of masculinity’. Details on the attached flyer.

http://www.stonybrook.edu/commcms/M%20McCormack%20Seminar.pdf

Hey Bro, Let’s Cuddle

My new post on Playboy, about men cuddling

http://www.playboy.com/articles/why-modern-men-like-to-cuddle

Maybe ‘that’s so gay’ isn’t homophobic anymore

In my new Conversation post, I develop my arguments about the meanings and effects of the phrase “that’s so gay” by discussing current research about how young gay men hear the phrase.

The Need for a Sexuality Education

In The Conversation, I call for a sexuality education that is compulsory for all and teaches about sex and sexuality in an holistic and nuanced way. This was covered in The Telegraph, and some of these arguments are developed further in The Declining Significance of Homophobia

Understanding LGBT Lives in a Context of Decreased Homophobia

Funded by the Sociological Review and hosted by the Centre for Sex, Gender and Sexualities at Durham University, I am organizing a conference that brings together academics from across the UK to understand how the social trend of decreasing homophobia maps onto the lives of a diverse range of LGBT people. More information here.

New article on social class and decreasing homophobia

coverI have just published an article in the British Journal of Sociology that examines how class intersects with masculinities within a broader social zeitgeist of decreasing homophobia. More information below, and article accessible here or here.

The intersection of youth masculinities, decreasing homophobia and class: an ethnography

This article examines the emergence of progressive attitudes toward homosexuality among working-class boys in a sixth form in the south of England to develop an intersectional analysis of class, youth masculinities and decreasing homophobia. Drawing on three months of ethnographic data collection, I find that working-class male youth intellectualize pro-gay attitudes and that homophobic language is almost entirely absent from the setting. I document the presence of homosocial tactility, as well as the valuing of friendship and emotional closeness. However, these behaviours are less pronounced than documented among middle-class boys, and I use these findings to advance understanding of how class influences the development of inclusive attitudes and behaviours. Inclusive masculinity theory is used to understand these findings, refining the theory and extending it to a new demographic.